TEF Times: 2nd Reading of the HE Bill

Academic Irregularities

In July 2016 we are contemplating a new period of instability for universities in the UK, and with the passing of the 2nd reading of HE Bill, things could quickly get a lot worse. The EU Referendum result has already created uncertainty regarding the future of much of our research funding. It seems there is much uncertainty at the top of UKHE: Universities UK (‘the definitive voice of UK universities’) has asked for the government to press the pause button on HE reform , Meanwhile, the vice-chancellors of Nottingham Trent and Exeter Universities argue for forging ahead with reform and the implementation of the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF).

Maddalaine Ansell, CEO of the University Alliance, appears to agree with the latter in her prediction that the HE Bill will take the sector to calmer waters.  Ansell’s premise is that there will be a benefit from having all legislation relating…

View original post 1,446 more words

Bureaucracy kills customer value creation 

Do you have energy vampires in your organisation?

When I read this recent article from the HBR blog How to stop people who bring things down with bureaucracy I couldn’t believe how it totally nailed many of the more motivation sapping experiences of academic and commercial life.

Author James Allen describes ‘energy vampires’ who create diversionary none value add activities.

These activities however well intentioned adversely diminish the energy and action that should be devoted to the creation of customer value.

Of course most organisations need some systems and processes to function. Sociologist Max Weber pointed this out years ago. The problem occurs when bureaucracy becomes self serving and self perpetuating. Bureacracy can be characterised by mindless demands for information, defensive records of decisions and actions – ‘just in case’ something bad happens, a form for this a form for that, multiple sign off forms, lots of data creation and little insight and information agility.

One of foremost writers and researchers on Bureacracy is David Graeber author of The Utopia of Rules. He recently wrote an article for Times Higher titled Why Won’t Academics Break Their Paper Chains.

I would recommend any business person to read his work to see what can happen in large organisations when the value creating imperative of the business is smothered by bureaucracy.

One on the central themes in our forthcoming book Value:ology is about the value creating and proposing capability of people in your company. With Co-authors Simon Kelly of Sheffield Business School and Stacey Danheiser of Shake Marketing we emphasise that without a dedicated focus on value creating activity you will waste time, money and energy on irrelevancies.

So can you spot the tell tale sales of value smothering in your business? James Allen gives a clue when he says watch out for people that:

‘….fire off lots of missives that force your people to stop serving the customer and instead respond to yet another information request’

 

Creating brand love means being tough on value 

Brand Love
One of the big ideas in brand management is the creation of brand love.  This is where the solutions you sell and the customer relationships and experiences you create result in customers who are passionate and committed to your brand.

But have you stopped to really think through what generates this passion and commitment in the first place?

The only way customers will love your brand is if it delivers value in a way that matters to them. True value resonates with your customers. This means you need to be tough on value in your organisation to prevent it being treated as ‘taken for granted’ or ‘glossy rhetoric’.

Adding value and creating customer value are often snappy sound bites that are very easy for people to buy into.When this happens you could have a serious problem when it comes to establishing what value means for your business. Ask yourself honestly; does everyone in the organisation have an aligned view on what are people talking about when they talk about value in general and customer value in particular?

Get tough on value conversations in your organisation by doing three things.

  • Don’t confuse it with satisfaction because that is only about after the purchase. It says a lot about wants and little about real needs.
  • Don’t confuse it with quality because that is about technical standards.
  • Don’t confuse it with your values because they are about you and not the customer.

Are you sure your team knows the difference?

Organization psychologist Kurt Lewin said there is nothing more practical than a good theory. He said this to make managers realise that an assumption has a direct influence on practice. Mistaken assumptions about ‘what’ value is results in irrelevant marketing implementation.

You can think of defining value in your business as just as important as NASA getting the trajectory calculations right for a space exploration vehicle such as the Mars Curiosity Rover. Even a small miscalculation on launch could have resulted in Curiosity missing big the red planet by thousands of miles.

Let’s say you assume that the primary benefit your customer is seeking is the best price. This might seem reasonable because the customer always mentions the price in conversations. Acting on this assumption could lead you to being way off target. Deeper understanding of the customer through careful unpacking of what is going on in their business world reveals that they value your detailed expertise and network of suppliers which means the relationship they have with you helps them compete in their market more effectively. The real value is in the supplier relationship not in the price.

If you don’t ask tough questions about what people mean by value then there is a very real risk your plans, product developments and campaigns will be off target. Worse still you’ll get locked into a cycle of repetitive problem solving as one thing after another is tried in the elusive hunt for customer value.

Barbara Caroll and Aaron Ahuvia in their article Some antecedents and outcomes of brand love – Market Lett (2006) 17: 79–89 define  brand love as “the degree of passionate emotional attachment that a person has for a particular trade name.”. A definition such as this is helpful in focusing attention key brand love attributes.

The challenge for the professional marketer of course lies in creating specific actions that predispose the customer to fall  and stay in love with your brand. It’s issues like this that are at the heart of the work my publishing colleagues Simon Kelly of Sheffield Business School UK and Stacey Danheiser of Shake Marketing USA address when they talk of the need to create resonant value propositions and ensure that sales and marketing activities are aligned.

Brand love needs a bit of tough love too.

If you are interested in the academic research into brand love then the following might be of interest:

Fournier, Susan (1998), “Consumers and Their Brands: Developing Relationship Theory in Consumer Research,” Journal of Consumer Research, 24 (4), 343–73.

Albert, Noel, Dwight Merunka, and Pierre Valette-Florence (2008), “When Consumers Love Their Brands: Exploring the Concept and its Dimensions,” Journal of Business Research, 61 (10), 1062–75

 

 

%d bloggers like this: