Interaction, interdependence and relationships : creating small business customer value. 


Last week myself and some colleagues from Sheffield Business School attended the IMP Conference on business to business marketing at Poznan University of Economics in Poland.

For over forty years the ideas of IMP research and thinking have influenced business study. In particular the IMP perspective explains how business works from a network perspective rather than a strategic management perspective. Central to this view is that business is all about interactions between different companies (and their people), interdependence between various businesses that bring products and services to customers and relationships that endure over the long term rather than one off transactions. When such networks work well value is created for all participants in the network 

So does any of this stuff really really happen in the practice of even the smallest of businesses I asked myself. To find an answer I looked at my son Alex’s Interior Design and Development business AJ Interior Developers Plymouth UK.

I was inspired to think about his business after viewing his Instagram pages and thinking how social media has shaped customer interactions and relationship building. It also helps with an idea from Service Dominant Logic which states that people like Alex can only propose the value of their service. The customer creates value afterwards through the use of the new home spaces he creates. The use of pictures of not only his finished work but work in progress too conveys to customers his skill and professionalism before they have experienced it for themselves. Instagram helps overcome the problem of service intangibility and invisibility.

His use of a Short Instagram video adds a different dimension to interaction as well because it brings some personality into play and stimulates the imagination of the customer to the possibilities for their own home.

In order for the customer to have a smart new home space Alex is plugged into a whole network of other people and businesses. Kitchen design companies like Wickes and Homebase, a referral network, specialist co-workers like gas engineers and building regulations, parts and raw material suppliers and so on. Everyone in the network is interdependent on the others. The situation is a lot more sophisticated than just ‘supplier – customer’.

The customer value that is created encompasses all of the dimensions of value that we talk about in our new book Value-ology. There is economic value regarding the price of the new space, perceived value regarding how the customer sees the new space such as their attitude to colours and fittings, then there is relational value regarding the service given by Alex and then there is experiential value that relates to how the customer feels about the installation experience and eventually living in and using the newly created space. 

So does the sophisticated thinking of IMP academics work in practice? For sure and that should hardly be surprising as the academics who form the IMP community are deeply interested in the everyday world of business and not just speculative theorising. Without real world business there would be no IMP.  For me Alex’s business is a classic demonstration of the IMP principals that underpin value creation for sure.

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